Meiosis and the Chromosome Number Challenge, Hour 2

meiosis_challenge

 

Post your group’s solution to the challenge using the “Add Image” function below.


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14 Responses to Meiosis and the Chromosome Number Challenge, Hour 2

  1. Daniel S, Brian E, Walker J, Gabby G says:

    Diploid cells split and each remaining cell has two attached pairs of chromosomes. The pairs of connected chromosomes split using the Spindle apparatus. The remaining cells split into four haploid cells. Each haploid cell has two different chromosomes.

    • Megan S, Alessander R, Jared C. says:

      The diagram shows a good picture of it but we think that the four cells that come out of it are genetically identical.

  2. Kylie M, Carter G, Mickey P, Jason K says:

    We suggest that the cell prepares for cell division through mitosis but does not divide. Then it prepares for division and goes through mitosis again and does divide into four haploid cells.

    • Daniel S, Brian E, Walker J, Gabby G says:

      We like the explanation however you did not mention the splitting of the chromosome pairs. Furthermore one cell cannot split into four through mitosis.

    • Eric C, Ronak L, Alex T, Erin B says:

      While Kylie’s group’s hypothesis makes sense, we do not agree that the spindle apparatus would be able to split into four in one division.

  3. Eric C, Ronak L, Alex T, Erin B says:

    Our hypothesis states that mother cell primarily splits in two, and then it divides once more, creating four daughter cells with half the amount of chromosomes in a regular, healthy cell.

    • Lauren F., Stacie W., Eden K., Parker J. says:

      There is another step after the second split. The centromere dissolves after the second division.

    • Kylie M, Carter G, Mickey P, Jason K says:

      The hypothesis that there are two splits makes sense, but our group wonders why the sister chromatid did not separate in the first split.

    • Sunny H Anita S Sirat G Cole W says:

      We see how it can divide twice but when do the chromosomes split. There seems to be a step missing.

  4. Lauren F., Stacie W., Eden K., Parker J. says:

    The cell divides in a series of steps. There is now one “n” chromosome in each cell. The first time it divides, there are two new cells, after which the centromere breaks and the chromosome divides, and the cells then split into four haploid cells, known as gametes.

    • Adam C., Vandita G., Will B. Elizabeth S. says:

      We agree with your group’s hypothesis. There are two steps of division in the process of meiosis, ultimately resulting in the production of 4 haploid cells.

  5. Adam C., Vandita G., Will B. Elizabeth S. says:

    The 2 diploid cells will divide, resulting in one duplicated chromosome in each cell, further dividing to result in 4 haploid cells.

  6. Megan S, Alessander R, Jared C. says:

    The number of chromosomes are turned in to haploid cells because they are divided from a diploid and they then are four genetically identical cells.

  7. Sunny H Anita S Sirat G Cole W says:

    The chromosomes in the original diploid cell split. Then the cells that have just split, divide into two new cells containing half of each chromosome. Once again, the cells divide into the final four haploid cells.

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