Current Event Summaries by Tristan W.

6 Responses to Current Event Summaries by Tristan W.

  1. IEC’s which stand for intestinal epithelial cells are in our intestines. Scientists have recently studied the adult male fly and its intestines. Surprisingly, they are almost exactly the same. They used the fly’s intestines to measure how IECs sense stress or damage, defend themselves and promote epithelial regeneration. IECs are exposed to many different types of stresses such as bacteria and toxins, but the mechanisms that epithelial cells to sense stress are not well understood. These adult male fly’s intestines will be very helpful in doing that.

    My personal reaction to this article was that I think that it is astounding to hear that the fly’s intestines are almost exactly the same to a human’s. I would imagine our intestines being closer to a mammal’s or something else like that. But to hear that the fly’s intestines are exactly the same is crazy. I think it was a good find by scientists because this could really help for future research about the insides of humans.

  2. Tristan Wight says:

    Title: Adult fly intestine could help understand intestinal regeneration
    URL:https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190925131416.htm
    Author(s): University of Bristol
    Published by: Science Daily
    Date: 9/25/19

  3. Tristan Wight says:

    Title: Urban beaches are environmental hotspots for antibiotic resistance after rainfall
    URL: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190930101621.htm
    Author(s):
    Published by: Science Daily
    Date: 9-30-19

    A two year study into the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in near-city coastal environments shows that some beaches around Sydney have increased the levels of antibiotic resistant (AbR) bacteria after it rains. New research provides clear links between storm-water discharge, which sometimes includes wet-weather sewer overflow (WWSO) events, and the presence of AbR in microorganisms living in beach habitats near cities. This increases risk for humans as it is harmful bacteria.

    My personal reaction to this was surprised because of how much of a risk there is on the beaches near cities, and most importantly Sydney. This bacteria sounds harmful and probably isn’t healthy for the human body. The research behind the evidence is also interesting because of how the severe weather has some impact on the bacteria.

  4. Tristan Wight says:

    Title: CRISPRed fruit flies mimic monarch butterfly, and could make you vomit
    URL: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191002131939.htm
    Author(s):
    Published by: Science Daily
    Date: 10-3-19
    Monarch butterflies and a few other insects like them evolved from almost the same genetic mutations allowing them to eat milkweed without getting sick. Monarch butterflies and caterpillars store the toxins to wave off predators. Scientists have now used CRISPR gene editing to make these same mutations in fruit flies, successfully transfering toxin resistance. This is the first time an animal has been genetically engineered to eat a new food and use a new type of deterrence. More studies were made to conclude that 20 other insect groups able to eat milkweed and other toxic plants — moths, beetles, wasps, flies, aphids, a weevil and a true bug, most of which use the color orange to warn away predators — all independently evolving the same gene to use the toxin to deter predators.

    My personal reaction to this article was impressed because of the technology that we have today. I think that it is incredible that scientists today are able to genetically modify bugs and how they process foods and toxins. They transferred literal genes from one bug to another. It is incredible. Now that fruit fly has the same evolved gene to deter predators and digest the toxin (milkweed) and not get sick.

  5. Tristan Wight says:

    Title: People eat more when dining with friends and family
    URL: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191004105637.htm
    Author(s):
    Published by: Science Daily
    Date: October 6 2019

    People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone. Possibly a throwback to our ancestors’ approach to survival, according to a new study. This phenomenon is known as ‘social facilitation’. Studies show that when you eat with friends and family that are close to you, you tend to eat 48 percent more food rather than 29 percent while eating alone. This may have been known as a survival mechanism to our ancestors. It also has to do with you being comfortable around people that are close to you. When you are around those people, you tend to eat more rather than alone.

    My personal reaction to this was surprised because it is not only weird but interesting. The fact that we do eat more with friends explains why there are always seconds and desert when eating with a group. I notice for myself that when eating alone or snacking, I do not usually get desert or seconds but find me doing that when I eat with groups and friends.

  6. Tristan Wight says:

    Title: Were hot, humid summers the key to life’s origins?
    Date: October 6 2019
    URL: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191004074858.htm
    Author(s):
    Published by: Science Daily

    Scientists have found that some minerals, which dissolve in water they absorb from air, can assist the construction of proteins from building blocks during cycles timed to mimic day and night on the early Earth. Without the warm and humid summers, the origin of life would have trouble to start out. This is important because without those summers, we possibly would not be here currently.

    My personal reaction to this was shocked because if you think back, if those summers were not humid and the correct temperature, would we have life? Or would we hardly exist or even at all. This interests me because it all could have gone differently.

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