Monthly Archives: December 2019

The Other Side

Where The Grass Is Always Greener

Mammal Monday – Brrrrr!

Wooly Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius)Image from Wikimedia Commons


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Frog Friday – Bilingual

Bird-voiced Treefrog (Hyla avivoca)Image from Wikimedia Commons Listen to the call of the Bird-voiced Treefrog


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Weedy Wednesday – Joyweed

Joyweed (Alternanthera echinocephala)Image from Wikimedia Commons


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Mammal Monday – Holiday “Horn”-aments

Caribou or Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus)Image from Wikimedia Commons Read more about this species here.


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Frog Friday – Take the Red Eye

Red-eyed Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)Image from Wikimedia Commons The frogs above are exhibiting a behavior called amplexus, in which a male amphibian grasps a female with his front legs as part of the mating process.


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Weedy Wednesday – Eastern Red Cedar

Eastern Redcedar (Juniperus virginiana)Image from Wikimedia Commons Unlike most invasive species, Eastern Redcedar is actually a native North American plant. It has become an invasive species ever since Europeans settled the Great Plains. It is highly susceptible to fire, but … Keep Reading


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Mammal Monday – First Furry Fossil

Castorocauda (Castorocauda lutrasimilis)Image from Wikimedia Commons Did you know? Castorocauda lutrasimilis was a semi-aquatic member of the order Docodonta, an extinct group of primitive mammals. As the name implies, it resembled a beaver or otter (“castoro” = beaver, “cauda” = … Keep Reading


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Frog Friday – Ready For My Closeup

American Bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus)Image from Wikimedia Commons


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Weedy Wednesday – Barnyard Grass

Japanese Millet (Echinochloa crusgalli)Image from Wikimedia Commons Did you know? The seed of the Japanese Millet plant is commonly used for feeding ducks because it grows well in flooded soils or standing water.


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